In teams of two:
2,000m Row (250m at a time)
100 Overhead plate lunges 25W,45M (rotate as needed)
100 KB Swings (rotate as needed) 32M, 24W
100 Box Jump (rotate as needed) 20W, 24M
1600m Run (200m at a time)

You got your log book, now find out what to do with it!

Log Book 101

So you got your log book, now what?  Here’s a quick walk through of where to keep it, how to label it, and what to record.
Storage
You can keep your log book with you at all times (and sleep with it under your pillow at night) or you can keep it at the shop.  If you choose to keep it at the shop please use the two new shelves above the tape and first aid.  The shelves are labeled A-L and M-Z to keep some organization.  We recommend writing your name on the inside of the spiral so it’s easy to find yours on the shelf. And, as Dizon displays in the photo above, if you put your name to the bottom then your pen won’t cover up your name.  Now that’s thinking!  If you plan to track your daily fuel then we recommend keeping the book with you at all times.
What to Record?
The question here is really how much do you want to keep track of?  In each daily page there is space to track the date, mobility work, workout, time, any scaled or modified components, sleep, water, fish oil, breakfast, lunch, dinner, post workout (P/W) recovery food, and snacks.  In addition at the back of the book there are spaces to keep track of benchmark workouts as well as max efforts.  We recommend AT THE VERY LEAST you keep track of all named workouts and max efforts (lifts, rows, runs, etc.).  We think it would be great if you took five minutes at the end of each class to scribble down your workout, time, etc.  The more you record, the more information we have to look back through to give insight to make tweaks and changes to your training and nutrition when things get off track.